BREWING PROCESS

Brewing beer begins with the selection and milling of the appropriate malts, the  purpose of which is to facilitate the activiy of the natural enzymes that will transform the starch contained in the malt grains into sugars. This process is knwon as mashing. In this phase, the mash undergoes a series of temperature steps, each of them with the purpose of activating a range of different processes that convert starch into both fermentable and non fermentable sugars.

 

Successive to the mashing process,the resulting wort is naturally filtered, in order to separate the spent grains from the wort itself. Wort is then boiled for a couple of hours. During this wort boiling phase, hops are added to the mixture, which will provide the beer with its characteristic bitterness as well as acting as a natural preserving agent.

 

Wort is later sent to the Whirlpool, which is filled in a tangential manner, hence creating a vortex that naturally separates solid proteins and hop remains from the liquid wort itself. Immediately after and prior to the yeast addition, wort is rapidly cooled down to 8°C (for Lager style beers) and sent to the fermenting vessels, where this temperature will be maintained for an entire week. After this first week of fermentation, vessels are hermetically sealed, thus enabling the CO2 released in the fermenting process itself - which transforms sugar into alcohol and CO2 -  to gradually disolve in the beer and obtaining in result a natural and controlled carbonation process.

 

This entire process is controlled by managing the vessel’s temperature and pressure, which in turn provide the exact amount of disolved CO2 in beer, therefore making it unnecessary to perform bottle or keg refermentations which often leave behind unpleasant lees.

 

Four weeks later, beer  is sent to horizontal vessels, where it enters the last maturation and stabilisation phase. Temperature now drops  to -1°C, which has a clarification and cold stabilisation effect. This whole process serves as a natural filtering procedure, acting as a natural decanter of the beer and hence achieving a final product that retains all properties and flavours initailly acquired from the malt extract.

 

It is after this last step that beer is ready for filling. As this is done by means of isobaric equipment, beer oxidation through air contact is  avoided, as well as helping to maintain constant carbonation levels, which in turn guarantee the beer’s freshness when leaving our premises.

 

CONTACT

Compañía Cervecera Zeta S.L.

Camí de la mar 21

ES-46120 Alboraya

zeta@zetabeer.com

Copyright 2016. ZETABEER · Aviso Legal y Política de Privacidad

 

Brewing beer begins with the selection and milling of the appropriate malts, the  purpose of which is to facilitate the activiy of the natural enzymes that will transform the starch contained in the malt grains into sugars. This process is knwon as mashing. In this phase, the mash undergoes a series of temperature steps, each of them with the purpose of activating a range of different processes that convert starch into both fermentable and non fermentable sugars.

 

Successive to the mashing process,the resulting wort is naturally filtered, in order to separate the spent grains from the wort itself. Wort is then boiled for a couple of hours. During this wort boiling phase, hops are added to the mixture, which will provide the beer with its characteristic bitterness as well as acting as a natural preserving agent.

 

Wort is later sent to the Whirlpool, which is filled in a tangential manner, hence creating a vortex that naturally separates solid proteins and hop remains from the liquid wort itself. Immediately after and prior to the yeast addition, wort is rapidly cooled down to 8°C (for Lager style beers) and sent to the fermenting vessels, where this temperature will be maintained for an entire week. After this first week of fermentation, vessels are hermetically sealed, thus enabling the CO2 released in the fermenting process itself - which transforms sugar into alcohol and CO2 -  to gradually disolve in the beer and obtaining in result a natural and controlled carbonation process.

 

This entire process is controlled by managing the vessel’s temperature and pressure, which in turn provide the exact amount of disolved CO2 in beer, therefore making it unnecessary to perform bottle or keg refermentations which often leave behind unpleasant lees.

 

Four weeks later, beer  is sent to horizontal vessels, where it enters the last maturation and stabilisation phase. Temperature now drops  to -1°C, which has a clarification and cold stabilisation effect. This whole process serves as a natural filtering procedure, acting as a natural decanter of the beer and hence achieving a final product that retains all properties and flavours initailly acquired from the malt extract.

 

It is after this last step that beer is ready for filling. As this is done by means of isobaric equipment, beer oxidation through air contact is  avoided, as well as helping to maintain constant carbonation levels, which in turn guarantee the beer’s freshness when leaving our premises.

BREWING PROCESS